Let's Chat | Call us: 212-502-3066

3 Strategies for Effectively Developing the Right Calling Approach

Posted by Steve Bookbinder on Feb 23, 2017 8:19:00 PM

Whether you’re new to sales, or an experienced pro, developing the right approach to making sales calls is a strategic advantage.
 
As a salesperson, oftentimes the first impression you make is over the phone. Whether that’s talking to a new prospect, building a client relationship, or maintaining contact with long term clients.
 
Developing an effective calling approach and phone persona is essential to your sales success. But how can you develop an approach that will consistently drive results?
 
Consider these 3 strategies as you develop, refine, and optimize your calling approach: 
 
sales call approach ideas


1. Personalize Your Message

Think about who you are calling and why you are calling them before you pick up the phone.

First, we must consider what kind of leads are you calling and what’s the right strategy for each?

For example, let’s say you were just assigned a new lead. This lead came in through the website as an inbound lead who downloaded your newest eBook. What’s the approach for this type of lead?

To start, we must do our best to research who the person is, what company they work for, why they might be interested in the eBook, and whether they’ve downloaded any other resources from your website.

Why are these things important?

Because each piece of information helps you paint a picture of who you are calling. The more you know about the company, the person, or the industry in general will set you up for success because you’ll be able to tailor your message by saying something that resonates with the lead.

In this inbound lead example, you could personalize your message in a simple, yet logical way by helping them identify the key takeaways from the eBook they just downloaded and offer ideas about how the information applies to their job, company, or industry.

Taking this approach helps you position yourself as an expert, presents your company/offering in a positive light, and lets you take the role of the helpful salesperson who is educating them on new information and solutions.

 

2. Build Your Sales Story

 Identifying the right approach for each type of lead is only part of the game. The next step is to build your value proposition by crafting a compelling sales story.

We often think that facts and figures are what motivate people to take action. But the truth? Facts and figures aren’t nearly as effective as telling a great story.

Let’s say you’ve got a prospect on the line and they want to learn more about your solution. Instead of rattling off numbers that will mean nothing to them, consider walking them through the story of how you’ve helped other companies, maybe even mention a competitor of theirs, and help them visualize how your product and/or service delivered results for that company.

For example, you could say something like: “We’ve had a lot of success with companies like yours who have experienced some of the same challenges you may be facing, so I’d like to learn more about what you’re doing, tell you how we’ve been implementing solutions for businesses like yours, and see if there’s a match.”

You’re not only going to get their attention fast, they’re going to want to know how they did it, when they started doing it, how far behind they are, and what they need to do to catch up.

 

3. Understand the Rhythm of the Call

Listening is the key to a great conversation. So when we are speaking with prospects and clients over the phone, we must listen to the rhythm of the call and make certain decisions based on the rhythm.

If you ask a question and the other person responds as soon as you finish speaking, this probably means they’re tuned in. On the other hand, if there’s a long gap and their response doesn’t really relate to the question you asked, they’re probably not connected to the conversation.

As sales professionals, our goal is to ask 2nd level questions in order to create a more substantial conversation. 2nd level questions, asked in the right context, encourage the customer to share relevant information needed to understand their true interest in our business solution as well as their motivation to help their organization acquire it.

This is the type of conversation when the customer reacts to the salesperson’s interest and capabilities by sharing relevant information about their background, biases, plans as well as their power, influence, and motivation to buy.

The best way to help them make more sales is to maximize their time with people most likely to buy and minimize their investment in time with the rest.  At the same time, sellers need to dig out opportunities that are not immediately obvious but lying just below the surface waiting for a skilled salesperson to uncover and close.

 

Conclusion

Remember these 3 strategies the next time you’re ready to pick up the phone, and you’ll be on your way to building a connection with your prospects and clients while creating a more open sales dialogue.

manager_HowMuchCoachingShouldIBeDoing_Vlog.png

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published in March 2013 and has been updated.

Read More

Topics: sales, tips, selling, sellers, prospecting, value, skills, sales tips, sales training, digital media training, cold calling, call, small business, improving, marketing, strategy, phone

How To Present a Proposal Over the Phone (Part 2)

Posted by Molly Depasquale on Jun 4, 2013 7:30:00 AM

3. How are you going to open up the meeting? sales_meeting_present_business Now, there’s no one right way to open every meeting.  But you should think about it.  You need to make a decision.  But I’ll tell you what works for me.  In the friendliest way possible, early on in every proposal meeting, I say something along the lines of,You know, thank you Mr. Prospect or Ms. Prospect for meeting with me today.  I’m hoping that we’ll be able to put together a deal.  And if we do, do you think my services would be implemented right away?”  That question will give you an answer to something that you’re eager to know, and it will be extremely helpful. You might be hesitant in asking this question or asking it in this manner. No worries! Translate it into a way that you can ask it.  Or if that’s not the right question for you, find the right question for yourself.  But keep asking yourself, “Is this always the best way to go?” and adjust the opening with each meeting. Customize the solution for your prospect.

fotolia_612132024. Defend why your proposal is right.  Many times, I listen to salespeople on the phone, and I can hear them explain the pricing. But they don’t say what I really want them to say from the prospect’s perspective, which is a very reassuring message. 

Hello Prospect, you know, after we spoke, I went back and looked at my notes.  I talked to my staff.  I went to our service team.  I did a little research and a little brainstorming.  And as a team, we came up with a plan that I think you’re really going to like.  It really addresses the issues that you’ve pointed out and that you’ve told me about. I know these were important to you.  Anyway, that’s how we created this proposal.”  Now maybe that’s not exactly the way you would say it.  But something along those lines would be reassuring.  After all, people react and reciprocate.  If you act with enthusiasm, the prospect is more likely going to be enthusiastic also.  If you act like you don’t care, then why should your prospect?

Let’s always remind ourselves of these four things we should do when we’re presenting a proposal over the phone: 

 

1. We’re verifying information. 

Involve the customer in developing your solution. Show someone your sale in writing before the proposal meeting whenever possible. Showing an outline of the proposal in advance gives you a chance to react and adjust.

 

2. We’re strategizing how far in advance to send the proposal. 

There is no one magical time in which all proposals that are sent over are magically approved.  Decide whether or not the proposal is powerful enough to speak for itself or make sure that you set aside the time to go through it with the prospect.

 

3. We’re deciding how we will open. 

Tailor a friendly opening and be prepared to ask what you need to ask to find out what you must.

 

4. And we’re preparing ourselves to defend why our proposal is right.

Are you giving your prospect reassurance? Have you completed thorough research, and are you prepared to give evidence to your claim?

 

 

About the Author:

Steve_Bookbinder

Steve Bookbinder is Co-founder and CEO of Digital Media Training, a training partner to some of the most successful sales organizations around the world.  DMT delivers training which treats sales as a competitive sport and changes behavior needed to help sellers consistently win.  DMT is a leader in M-learning training reinforcement with a proven track record of improving sales through training. Steve has delivered more than 500 keynote speeches at national sales meetings, conducted more than 3,000 training workshops and trained, coached and managed more than 35,000 sellers and managers from leading companies around the world for more than 20 years.

 

Free Checklist

 

Were these questions thought-provoking? Let us know your thoughts. Have a suggestion for a new topic? Please comment in the box below. 

 

Read More

Topics: present, selling, sellers, sales process, dealing with a customer, sales tips, sales training, call, sales strategy, presentation

How To Present A Proposal Over the Phone

Posted by Molly Depasquale on Jun 3, 2013 10:52:00 AM

explain_group_computer_meeting_business

Today I want talk to you about presenting your proposal when you’re selling over the phone.  There are four: 


1. Verifying information. things to consider:

2. Strategizing how far in advance to send the proposal. 

3. Deciding how you will open. 

4. Preparing to defend why your proposal is right. 

 

1.  Let’s start with verifying information. 

What’s a proposal?  You write something on a digital piece of paper.  If you wrote “the right thing,” the customer will buy and if you didn’t, the customer won’t buy.  And so, there’s a lot riding on your writing the right thing.  So make sure you’re incorporating the customer in that process.  If your customer is not in some way involved in advising you as to what the right budget level is, the offer, and the timing of the delivery as well as any other specs that are important to know, then you’re guessing.  And the customer is less likely to buy. 

You don’t want to guess-sell.  You want to know for sure.  There’s a lot riding on this.  And by verifying information first, you could dramatically improve your proposal-to-closing ratio.  How do you start? Show an outline, one or two pages that explain, “Here’s what I’m thinking of pricing, selling, and delivering and all those specs” in advance of any proposal meeting.  By doing so, you are giving yourself a chance to obtain a reaction and adjust the proposal if need be.  Also, it’s important to show somebody your sale in writing before the proposal, whenever possible.  If the first time that the customer sees your sale in writing is the proposal, it tends not to reflect as well on you than if you had showed some kind of "friendlier" of document beforehand. 

2. Consider is how far in advance of the meeting to send the proposal. 

I would say that there are times that it makes sense not to let your client see the proposal until you’re going to review  it together.  This is because many times proposals are written in such a way that a customer can get concerned, confused, or thrown off.  Or the document is so big that the customer scans it very briefly and misses everything.  And so by going through it with the customer, we’re sure that we’re capturing every point.  If you send the proposal far in advance, they may have a chance to read it.  And there may be some benefit to that.  And so my advice to you is if you’re going to send it in advance, it should be a decision that you made (in your mind, you felt that the proposal could sell itself). However, if you don’t believe that the proposal itself is extremely well-written and a powerful communicator, my advice to you is this:

Go over the points in your proposal together with your client so that there’s a very small gap there.

 

 

About the Author:

Steve_Bookbinder

Steve Bookbinder is Co-founder and CEO of Digital Media Training, a training partner to some of the most successful sales organizations around the world.  DMT delivers training which treats sales as a competitive sport and changes behavior needed to help sellers consistently win.  DMT is a leader in M-learning training reinforcement with a proven track record of improving sales through training. Steve has delivered more than 500 keynote speeches at national sales meetings, conducted more than 3,000 training workshops and trained, coached and managed more than 35,000 sellers and managers from leading companies around the world for more than 20 years.

 

 

Was this post helpful? Please comment down in the box below and let us know how you felt!

Read More

Topics: selling, sellers, customer's perspective, dealing with a customer, sales tips, sales training, call, sales strategy, buying process, deals, presentation, reaction

4 Easy Steps: How to Become Your Own Coach

Posted by Molly Depasquale on Apr 26, 2013 8:05:00 AM

3. Veering off course.  Should you make a left as part of your big plan, or do you make a left and call that ‘"veering off course?" Just because you’re making a left turn doesn’t necessarily mean that you’re veering off course.  What matters is this: Think about what you want to accomplish and why you want to accomplish it. Why is it so important to you, and are you trying to achieve something positive or avoid something negative?  If the energy associated with your reason or desire for wanting to accomplish this goal is strong enough, it will force you take at least 1 step forward every day.  Now, whether you take that step by directly heading forward or moving towards the left just a little, - as sailors do sometimes when trying to reach a destination -  consider veering if your other alternative is stopping. 

       success_failure_choose_roads

4. Movement.  One of the things I like to consider is how similar people are to the planets in the solar system. In the same way that planets revolve, rotate, have a gravitational pool, and are part of an orbit, some very important people have an orbit of things and people that go around them. For example, the earth has satellites that go around us; some bigger planets have many moons going around them.

universe_space_never_ending

Both you and I are in pursuit of our goals. Often times, that goal is at least in part accomplished by meeting someone or getting that someone to buy into our concept, approve us, hire us, agree to train us, and work with us. Often in life, it’s about who we meet.  Well, the people that we want to meet or get an introduction to will be moving all the time, and they each have an orbit of things around them.  If you want to meet with them, you need to recognize that you’re trying to hit a moving target while you yourself are on the move You are indeed moving even if you’re standing still because you’re growing a day older (and wiser) every day. Everything that you’re trying to do is now one day closer to being accomplished, but this also means that one more day was spent in pursuit of this goal, adding to your weariness.

As you’re trying to hit a moving target consider the kinds of activities that will put you in the right orbit so that you’ll be more likely to “bump” into people that you need to bump into.  How long will it take?  Well, it’s going to be a long process, but it is exceedingly long if you’re not at it every single day.

 

 

 

About the Author:

Steve_Bookbinder

Steve Bookbinder is Co-founder and CEO of Digital Media Training, a training partner to some of the most successful sales organizations around the world.  DMT delivers training which treats sales as a competitive sport and changes behavior needed to help sellers consistently win.  DMT is a leader in M-learning training reinforcement with a proven track record of improving sales through training. Steve has delivered more than 500 keynote speeches at national sales meetings, conducted more than 3,000 training workshops and trained, coached and managed more than 35,000 sellers and managers from leading companies around the world for more than 20 years.

 

 

Read More

Topics: deadlines, training, tips, selling, sellers, value, skills, sales training, team, veering, one step closer

Isn't It "Obvious?" (Part 2)

Posted by Molly Depasquale on Apr 22, 2013 8:52:00 AM

(3.) Their perspective.  Not only do you need to ask the right questions and do so by thinking from the perspective of the customer.  How do you reach their perspective?  It starts off with an understanding of their business and here are a few steps that I like to go through:

 marketing_cloud_seo-1

First off, after all of the research you have conducted, boil it down in terms of the kind of company you’re dealing with.  Do you understand how this company went to market and how big of a market share they have?  Who are their competitors?  Even if you can’t sell to this particular company, consider the possibility that their competitors have the potential to become your next leads. So actively seek out that kind of information, determine their go-to-market strategy and how they make money.

 

 What’s their distribution strategy?  How do things operate within the company?  And once you understand how things operate there, you have a sense of the kind of departments they’re likely to have, the services they’re likely to need, and learn about why they would be more willing to expend more resources in one area than another.  Understanding the business of your customer is what’s going to help you ask better questions.

 

(4.) And, finally, provide explanations  Some people are so afraid to ask the obvious question, thinking that that’s what’s going to end the sale.  But let’s just say that that terrible fear was realized. After asking the obvious question,  your customer looks back at you with a question mark as if to say, “I can’t believe you’re asking such an obvious question.”  You need to be ready for that moment just like any moment in sales.  Be ready for anything that you can anticipate and say to them, “Well, the reason I’m asking is…” and then deliver an answer which sounds credible and basically translates into, “Because in the analysis of my prospects, I need to learn certain things about my customers’ business in order for me to evaluate whether or not I am qualified to deliver that service to you, and I wanted to make sure because I have an obligation to you to understand your problem and figure out early on if I can bring any value to the equation.”  This is the reason to ask obvious questions.

 

Below are helpful questions to keep in mind as you’re conducting research or trying to think from the perspective of your customer:

 
  1. Have you ever considered buying from us in the past?

  2. Do you work with any of our competitors? Why them? Why not us?

  3. How come we haven’t already done business together?

  4. Why did you buy the services you have now?

  5. How do you determine the budget for new services?

  6. How does your business make money?

  7. What has to happen for your company to exceed its goals?

  8. What has to happen for your department to exceed its goals?

  9. Is your department affected if sales increase or decrease?

  10. How is your department affected by changes in the marketplace?

  11. Are people in your department worried about losing their jobs?

  12. How did you obtain your current position?

  13. Are your customers, partners, and distributors global, national or local?

  14. What would we have to do to gain your business?

  15. Who does your company compete against?

  16. How does your company gain a competitive edge over your competitors?

 

And don't be afraid to ask obvious questions. 

magnify_question_mark_400_clr_4858
 Embrace it and keep these 4 reasons behind asking at the forefront of your mind: 

(1) Great stories, (2) The right questions, (3) Their perspective, and (4) Explanations.

  

 

About the Author:

Steve_Bookbinder

Steve Bookbinder is Co-founder and CEO of Digital Media Training, a training partner to some of the most successful sales organizations around the world.  DMT delivers training which treats sales as a competitive sport and changes behavior needed to help sellers consistently win.  DMT is a leader in M-learning training reinforcement with a proven track record of improving sales through training. Steve has delivered more than 500 keynote speeches at national sales meetings, conducted more than 3,000 training workshops and trained, coached and managed more than 35,000 sellers and managers from leading companies around the world for more than 20 years.

Read More

Topics: training, selling, sellers, skills, customer's perspective, sales tips, sales training, team, competitors, research, obvious questions

Isn't It "Obvious?" (Part 1)

Posted by Molly Depasquale on Apr 19, 2013 7:26:00 AM

There are four reasons why I want you to ask the "obvious" question during an interview with a customer. The reasons are as follows:

1. Great stories.

2. The right questions.

3. Their perspective

4. Explanations.

What's obvious to one person can be a source of oblivion to another.  This is applicable to when a salesman meets a customer. Why?  Because the salesperson works for one kind of a company, and the customer works for a completely different kind of a company in a completely different kind of a role.  And so the two of them are not likely to agree on what "obvious" may be.

They worry about asking an obvious question – as if there was a death penalty associated with it.  I’ve spoken to 30,000 salespeople and none of them have ever told me that they were kicked out of an office for asking a too obvious of a question.  But what sometimes happens – and many times does in fact happen – is that the obvious question triggers a story.  So it’s not the question; it’s the story answer it produces.  That’s the key concept.  So what question is going to get you onto the very subject about how important solving their issues are and how you can help? How are you going to get into that conversation if you’re not talking about that subject?  How are you going to get there if you’re not talking about some “obvious” question?

Ask the right questions. You need to think about the world from the point-of-view of the person you’re meeting with.  Imagine being in that kind of a company which makes money in a certain way and has organized itself with a certain go-to-market strategy. It is constructed in a unique way and has a certain kind of market share and they do things in a particular way.  What questions can you ask will really get to the heart of the matter? 

Really get into the customer’s shoes, so to speak, and imagine the world from where they are and the only way to do that is to research.  But once the thorough research is completed, you’re now able to ask the most important question. It’s as if you’ll be the "mirror" organization and this client was meeting his counterpart (you) and the two of you now completely understand each other. How can you solve your client's challenges?  What is that one problem that is the trickiest  of them all? 

This is the kind of question that you want to be asking: How is the client solving those "obvious" issues?

 

 

About the Author:

Steve_Bookbinder

Steve Bookbinder is Co-founder and CEO of Digital Media Training, a training partner to some of the most successful sales organizations around the world.  DMT delivers training which treats sales as a competitive sport and changes behavior needed to help sellers consistently win.  DMT is a leader in M-learning training reinforcement with a proven track record of improving sales through training. Steve has delivered more than 500 keynote speeches at national sales meetings, conducted more than 3,000 training workshops and trained, coached and managed more than 35,000 sellers and managers from leading companies around the world for more than 20 years.

Read More

Topics: training, tips, selling, sellers, sales process, value, skills, sales tips, sales training, client, call, strategy, reaction, coaching

How to Be a Great Interviewer

Posted by Molly Depasquale on Apr 18, 2013 11:26:00 AM

The interviewing phase is where we’re going to learn whatever we need to learn in order to eventually close the sale. There are four things we need to consider if we’re going to do a great job interviewing:

 

1. Know what to ask. 

2. Sound curious. 

3. React versus respond. 

4. Learn buying patterns. 

 

(1.) Know what to ask before you go into the meeting. Think about the following:

  • Have we ever worked in the past with similar organizations? 

  • What’ve we done with them? 

  • When we went into those sales, who did we encounter?  What sort of political things were going on?

look_for_binoculars_surprised_faceIf you’re meeting with the head of one division, are you likely to have to meet with the heads of the other departments or people in other locations? What type of sale are you likely to  get from that kind of company?  And if you’ have to meet with the other influencers, you need to ask about who those people are.  The more you think about the potential sales opportunities you have within that organization, the more likely it is that you'll be directed to the other kind of questions that will provide you with insight into your customer.  Think about all of those questions up front and write them down.

(2.) When you’re asking a question, you want to sound curious.  Because when you do, it will sound like you’re having a great conversation.  Note the use of the terms “conversation” and “interviewing” and not the more common word, “probing,” which sounds so clinical and cold. This term will benefit no one.   

To have a good relationship with someone, a great conversation is a way to get there.  There’s a lot of things that need to be done.  First, make sure that when you’re speaking, you sound like the way great interviewers sound on shows – which I encourage you to listen to or watch to observe the way that they sound. Interviewers do the majority of the asking, and the interviewee is actually does the majority of the talking.  The person who’s doing the majority of the talking is not the one leading the meeting.  If you get me to answer your questions, then you’re in charge and the one who is leading the meeting. You are the leader, and that’s the position you want to be in. How do you get there? One way is to take notes.  When we take notes, we’re sending a nonverbal signal to the other person, implying that we think what they’re saying is important.

dice_hand_probability

The more you write, the more they tend to talk. 3. React versus respond.  When we react, we’re listening closely to what the other person just said.  We’re clarifying ambiguous statements about the need, budget, or timing.  Be on the alert for things like the word “soon.”  You want to say, “When you say soon, do you mean next week?  Next month?  Next year?” 

“When you say that you’re willing to spend a lot of money to solve that problem – when you say that - do you mean $1,000.00?  $100,000.00?  $1 billion?”  We want to get that out of the way and come to a mutual  understanding. When we ask those kind of questions, we’re clarifying what they said.  This makes it sound more like you’re listening and not interrogating.

“Well, never mind about what you were just telling me, Mr. Customer.  What about what you’re going to buy from me?” This sort of thing sounds very self-serving.  We do not want to respond, but rather react. Clarify ambiguous statements about timelines, budgets, and need. 

(4.) And finally, you need to know about buying patterns.  How did the customer buy the last time?  Who was involved?  How did they process the buying?  How did they onboard?  And why do they do it that way?  And has this person ever been part of that process?  Did he or she lead it last time?  Why did it turn out the way that it did?  And why did company reject previous offers?  And did you ever try to get that piece of work before?  Why hasn’t the company already bought from you? 

How come they bought from the companies they bought from?  When we learn the buying patterns, we are more likely to get the sale because we’re going to fit our sales process into their buying process.  But if we ignore their buying patterns, we will look like pushy salespeople.  A pushy salesperson ignores your buying patterns. 

Remember these 4 factors before going into that next interview:

 

Know what to ask. 

Sound curious. 

React versus respond. 

And learn their buying patterns. 

 

 

About the Author:

Steve_Bookbinder

Steve Bookbinder is Co-founder and CEO of Digital Media Training, a training partner to some of the most successful sales organizations around the world.  DMT delivers training which treats sales as a competitive sport and changes behavior needed to help sellers consistently win.  DMT is a leader in M-learning training reinforcement with a proven track record of improving sales through training. Steve has delivered more than 500 keynote speeches at national sales meetings, conducted more than 3,000 training workshops and trained, coached and managed more than 35,000 sellers and managers from leading companies around the world for more than 20 years.

    

   

 

 

Read More

Topics: training, tips, sellers, value, skills, sales tips, sales training, strategy, interviewing

4 To Dos to Improve Sales Everyday

Posted by Molly Depasquale on Apr 17, 2013 8:30:00 AM

Everyone who’s serious about accomplishing their goals will find a way to inspect their work to ensure that they’re making progress.  You should too.

To Do List:

1. Do a daily pipeline check.

2. Inspect your calendar.

3. Check your KPIs.

4. Keep testing new strategies.

1. There is nothing more sobering than either beginning or ending the day by looking at your pipeline.  Oh, my goodness!  Although you’re very busy, you may realize something new and say to yourself, “What am I so busy doing again?  Because - whatever it is - it’s not changing my pipeline.”  Your income is going to come out of that pipeline.  Everything you do needs to be coming out of that pipeline.  You want to make sure that you’re doing the things that can actually shape and improve the look of that pipeline. 

 

 desk_calendar_month_800_clr_38922. Inspect your calendar. If you look at your pipeline first, you will bereminded  of certain call opportunities. It will help you make decisions about calling or emailing some folks and the  decisions you make will impact your time.  Now, go look at that calendar on your desk or phone and ask yourself, “Where’s my time going? Am I spending my time in a way that makes the most sense, given what my pipeline looks like and what it needs to look like?"  Align your activities with your goals.  The single biggest mistake that people make is being unable to focus on the activities that will bring them closer to their goals on a daily basis. Don't make that mistake!

 

3. Track your KPIs.  In sales, KPIs are the number of dials, completed calls, visits, and sales.  What does each one mean? Track the dials that lead to first meetings, introduction meetings, meetings that begin a new sale either with an existing customer or a new one. Don’t count the number of times that you simply pick up the phone and call someone.   Track the number of completed calls or the number of times you actually speak on the phone with that person.  Track the number of First Appointments, or first meetings that initiate the sales process on the verge of a new opportunity, and track how many of the First Appointments are closed.

user_interested_content

After a while, you will begin to learn your ratios and find a pattern.

How many dials does it take to get a completed call?

How many completed calls are required to get an appointment?

How many appointments result in a certain number of sales?

What is the average value of each sale? 

When you start to work with those ratios and develop new strategies, you will gain an understanding of what you’re really accomplishing. If you don’t, you will inevitably do the wrong things because how else will you know if you’re generating the right number of leads or allocating the right amount of time unless you know the number of dials it takes to get a sale?  Track your KPIs all the time. When you track things, you’re subconsciously driving yourself towards an improvement in behavior. 

 

4. Keep testing new strategies.  It’s very common to conclude that the best way to drive from point A to B is this one route and to do everything in a pattern that utilizes that proven method. Yes, indeed consistency is great. However, how do you know that there isn’t another smoother or more efficient way to double up on productivity?  Unless you’re testing out new strategies all the time, you won’t.   

 

 

 At all times, think about:

“What’s another way that I could get old leads to come back and talk to me?” 

“What’s a way that I could get sales that had stalled out to come back?”

“How do I get sales that were this big to be a little bit bigger?”

share_of_voice_word_cloud

 

 You will begin to develop a certain amount of energy derived from this type of creative thinking and before you know it, you’re suggesting things and doing things, spending time in a way that you hadn’t done before.  Your focus will be on making these newly found strategies work for you. The energy associated with testing these strategies is something that can’t be measured, but it is the single most common factor evident in all great sales people.

 

So there are four things you want to be doing:  check your daily pipeline, inspect your calendars, track your KPIs, and test out new strategies all the time.

 

New Call-to-Action

 

 

 

About the Author:

Steve_Bookbinder

Steve Bookbinder is Co-founder and CEO of Digital Media Training, a training partner to some of the most successful sales organizations around the world.  DMT delivers training which treats sales as a competitive sport and changes behavior needed to help sellers consistently win.  DMT is a leader in M-learning training reinforcement with a proven track record of improving sales through training. Steve has delivered more than 500 keynote speeches at national sales meetings, conducted more than 3,000 training workshops and trained, coached and managed more than 35,000 sellers and managers from leading companies around the world for more than 20 years.

 

Read More

Topics: training, tips, sellers, value, skills, sales tips, sales training, call, business, strategy, A to B, optimize, dials, KPIs, First Appointment, Completed calls

Can I Have an Appointment for Wednesday at 1:00? (Part 2)

Posted by Molly Depasquale on Apr 11, 2013 8:15:00 AM

Yesterday, we spoke about advocating the advantage of your product, not igniting an argument. It is also crucial to demonstrate curiosity by asking thoughtful questions. Here is the third ingredient to transforming an objection to a great appointment: customize.

How do you customize a prospecting call? Well, the more carefully you listen to the actual words people use to respond to you during the call, the more effectively you’lI be able to feed those words back to the person.   

cost

So if someone tells you, "I don't think you'd be able to work within our budget," find a way to use the words "work within your budget" in your response.

"You know, ABC Company had the exact same concern at first, until they were able to see how we could create a plan that did work within their budget. I'd love to get together with you so I could show you how we did it. What about Wednesday at 1:00?"

You also want to customize the length of the turnaround.  If they have a very short objection -- for instance, "Listen, I’m not interested" – you won’t have the opportunity for half-hour long turnaround.  You must get right to the point.

 

And finally, the fourth ingredient that will complete the savory dish is passion.

Suppose you get on the phone with someone and say, "Hello, this is ___, I’m making a lot of calls today. And I was hoping, after dealing with this whole long list of people who said 'no,' that maybe you might say 'yes' to me." 

That call is headed towards a dark and lonely hallway.

hand_over_mouth_shut_up

Think about the prospect’s perception. To our horror, most sales that calls they receive may actually sound like that.

We want to make sure that the energy and tonality in all of our calls are genuine and effective. We want it to go more like this:

"This is ___, and the reason Im calling is that I could not sleep last night. I was up at two in the morning thinking about what your company does, what we do, and you know, it occurred to me that we can make some serious money together.  We should be talking about working together.  I know we can work with a company like yours, and I know we can bring a lot of value.

 

 

"___, stop! OBJECTION! OBJECTION!"

 

"Hey, I hear you, but you know what? A lot of my current customers were in that same place before they saw how we could help them.  We should really get together. Are you free Wednesay at 1?"

If you deliver the kind of message like that, the other person’s going to think about meeting with you.  Why?  Because when you speak with passion and conviction, you tend to get more positive responses that holds much potential.

So remember these 4 the next time you're prospecting on the phone:

  1. Advocate the Advantage
  2. Interest and curiosity
  3. Customize
  4. Passion

 

 

About the Author:

Steve_Bookbinder

Steve Bookbinder is Co-founder and CEO of Digital Media Training, a training partner to some of the most successful sales organizations around the world.  DMT delivers training which treats sales as a competitive sport and changes behavior needed to help sellers consistently win.  DMT is a leader in M-learning training reinforcement with a proven track record of improving sales through training. Steve has delivered more than 500 keynote speeches at national sales meetings, conducted more than 3,000 training workshops and trained, coached and managed more than 35,000 sellers and managers from leading companies around the world for more than 20 years.

Read More

Topics: sales, training, tips, affordable, selling, sellers, sales process, prospecting, value, prospect, strategy

Opportune Objections in Inbound Telesales (Part 2)

Posted by Molly Depasquale on Apr 9, 2013 9:30:00 AM

3. Know what to expect. At the end of the call, the person's either going to buy from you,
reject the offer, or delay making the decision. You already know what’s coming! So why
not be ready? When the customer says, “No,” ask something like, “I'm just curious as to
why?"

shrug_unsure_unknown

And when you hear the reason for the rejection, what you're going to learn is that it boils
down to one of several things, namely the 4 below:

"I have no interest in this."

"I've already got something like it."

"Why don't you just send me some information about it?"

"Let me ask you yet another question."

If the customer says something like, "I don't see any interest in it," this translates into:

"I have no time for that." 

"I have no money for that."

"I have no interest in that."

"I have no need for it."

“I once did something like that. I really hated it."

All of these are different versions of, "Not interested."

Take this important information and approach it at a fresh new angle.

point_of_view_frame_up

You: "You know what? Others have said that before they saw how our products could

really benefit them." or "Others have said that before they saw the advantages of our products."

Now, if the customer says, "Well, I've already got something that's like that," rather than argue that yours is different and better, consider simply saying, "You know, others have said that before they saw how our product complements and enhances what you've already got."

Customer: "Why don't you send me something?"

You: "You know what? We're talking right now. If I were to send you something, I'd be guessing what to send you. But if you and I could talk this through, in ten minutes or less, you're going to figure out exactly if we're the right offering for you."

4. If the customer asks you another direct question, respond to it, and ask your own
question, "Can I ask?" When you ask questions, you need to ask it in a very disarming
manner.

These following types of conversation-starters will be more likely to get you an answer:

"Can I ask you a question?"

"I've always wondered."

"I'm really curious."

"Another customer told me this..."

"Can I ask you this?"

Ask a disarming, do-based question about what they do that you typically help people do
better. See the following for reference:

"So what are you doing now to buy that service and save money?"

"What are you doing now to find availability in that product?"

The customer might say, "We're doing something."

You can respond with, "You know, a lot of people are doing that, and they find that what
we do really complements that approach."

You can also say, "You know, a lot of people also aren't doing anything about that, and they
find that doing something with us has a real advantage. I'd like you to consider buying
from us."

Try these approaches, and I promise you that you'll have more successful conversations, a
more positive outlook, and successful sales.

Remember these 4 when you're looking for the opportunity in that objection:

1. Slow Motion
2. Agree
3. Know What to Expect
4. “Can I ask?”

 

 

About the Author:

Steve_Bookbinder

Steve Bookbinder is Co-founder and CEO of Digital Media Training, a training partner to some of the most successful sales organizations around the world.  DMT delivers training which treats sales as a competitive sport and changes behavior needed to help sellers consistently win.  DMT is a leader in M-learning training reinforcement with a proven track record of improving sales through training. Steve has delivered more than 500 keynote speeches at national sales meetings, conducted more than 3,000 training workshops and trained, coached and managed more than 35,000 sellers and managers from leading companies around the world for more than 20 years.

Read More

Topics: sales, training, tips, affordable, selling, sellers, value, skills, sales tips, client, improving, strategy